Research Resources

This section shares benchmarking and related research information from inside Starkey Hearing Technologies, including detailed methodology used in data collection.

HRTF sets for BTE, ITE, ITC, CIC, and IIC styles

This data set is provided by Starkey Laboratories, Inc. ("Starkey Labs") as open-access files and may be used freely. Starkey Labs provides this data set on an "AS IS" basis without any representations or warranties. Any risk associated with using the data set or any portion thereof is the responsibility of the user and is not the responsibility of Starkey Labs. By downloading and/or using the contents of the data set you are agreeing to the foregoing.

Please use the following citation if using this data set in a publication:

Durin, V., Carlile, S., Guillon, P., Best, V., and Kalluri, S. (2014). "Acoustic analysis of the directional information captured by five different hearing aid styles." J Acoust Soc Am 136(2): 818-828.

Overview

A microphone placed at the entrance of the ear canal can measure the filtering function of the ear (the HRTF). As the system works linearly, any sound may then be filtered using the HRTF to get an estimate of the actual perceived spectrum. An HRTF set, the aggregation of HRTFs from every direction around the head, summarizes all the location-dependent variation of an acoustic signal. Systematic location-dependent variations of HRTFs in a given set help identify the acoustic cues available for human listeners to use for localizing sounds.

The HRTF sets were measured in a collaborative research project between Starkey Hearing Technologies, VAST Audio, and the University of Sydney. A peer-reviewed article in the Journal of the Acoustical Society of America (Durin, Carlile et al. 2014) gives details of the measurement procedures and technical details of the data set. Given the sometimes large variations in HRTFs for small changes in sound-source location especially at high frequencies, a dense sampling of locations is valuable in HRTF sets. The HRTF sets reported here were recorded for 393 different loudspeaker locations. The loudspeaker locations were distributed all around the head spaced very finely approximately 10-degrees apart, with only locations more than 45-deg below the horizontal plane not being sampled. The measurements were made with a head-and-torso simulator (HATS) mannequin combined with an impression model of the original HATS pinna and an impression model of the ear canal of a human subject.

References

  1. Durin, V., Carlile, S., Guillon, P., Best, V., and Kalluri, S. (2014). "Acoustic analysis of the directional information captured by five different hearing aid styles." J Acoust Soc Am 136(2): 818-828.
  2. Moller, H. (1992). "Fundamentals of binaural technology." Applied acoustics 36(3): 171-218.

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